SouthPoint

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The Atlanta Fed's SouthPoint offers commentary and observations on various aspects of the region's economy.

The blog's authors include staff from the Atlanta Fed’s Regional Economic Information Network and Public Affairs Department.

Postings are weekly.


11/13/2014


Signs Point Up for Regional Manufacturing

Have you ever noticed all the signs in the world around you? They are everywhere. Many of them can prompt some deep thought. For instance, I was recently driving to work one morning, and three deer ran out in the road in front of me. Luckily, I didn't hit them, but it made me wonder: Who decides where to put deer crossing signs? How do they know a deer wants to cross the road right there?

Speaking of signs worth your attention, the signs for southeastern manufacturing are pointing up, according to the latest Southeast Purchasing Managers Index (PMI), which was released on November 6. The report suggests that things look pretty strong, and digging into the report, one could conclude that things are even stronger than they initially appear.

The Atlanta Fed's research department uses the Southeast PMI (produced by the Econometric Center at Kennesaw State University) to track manufacturing activity in the Southeast. The survey analyzes current conditions in the manufacturing sector in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The Southeast PMI is based on a survey of representatives from manufacturing companies in those states and analyzes trends in new orders, production, employment, supplier delivery times, and inventory levels. A reading above 50 indicates that manufacturing activity is expanding, and a reading below 50 indicates that activity is contracting.

The PMI increased to 56.5 in October, which was a 1.5 point increase over September (see the chart). Some notable highlights:

  • The new orders subindex remained especially strong in October, registering 64.4, which is a 3.4 point increase over September's 61.0. New orders have averaged a solid 60.7 for the year.
  • The production subindex increased significantly to 67.3 during October, 8.3 points higher than September's reading of 59.0.
  • The employment subindex fell 2.2 points from the previous month. October's reading of 54.8 still indicates that manufacturing payrolls are increasing.
  • The supplier deliveries subindex rose 3.8 points during October, indicating that delivery of inputs is slowing as a result of high demand.
  • The finished inventories subindex fell 5.7 points compared with September and sits at 41.3. The fall in finished inventories suggests that inventory levels are lower than the previous month and could lead to higher orders in the near future.
  • The commodity prices subindex fell to 51.0, a 2.0 point decrease from September.
Southeast Purchasing Managers Index

When asked for their production expectations over the next three to six months, only 21 percent of survey participants expect production to be higher, down from 50 percent in September. According to the survey, 19 percent of survey respondents expect production to be lower than their current production levels. Those responses imply that 60 percent expect production to stay at current levels.

So to recap: The PMI indicates that regional manufacturing has seen strong new orders and production, employments levels are expanding, demand for inputs could be slowing deliveries, inventory levels are falling, commodity prices are essentially flat, and most purchasing managers are expecting to remain at their current levels of production. Although the low production expectations for the next three to six months prevent it from being a perfect set of conditions, they collectively indicate strong manufacturing activity in the near future. Just as with the deer crossing signs, I'll be paying close attention.

By Troy Balthrop, a Regional Economic Information Network analyst in the Atlanta Fed's Nashville Branch

November 13, 2014 in Economic conditions, Employment, Inventories, Manufacturing, Prices, Productivity, Southeast | Permalink

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11/04/2014


Heading into Fall, Florida's Recovery Continues

In an August SouthPoint post about economic conditions in north and central Florida, we stated that the sentiment of our contacts during the summer had been the most upbeat since before the recession. Since then, the Jacksonville REIN team has met with more than 50 business contacts, and it was very clear that the optimism was ongoing.

Contacts were upbeat as revenues and volumes increased. Demand for residential purchase mortgages met expectations, and residential lot development had made a comeback since the recession. Activity in multifamily real estate was robust, commercial loan activity improved, and office space absorption increased.

Employment and labor markets
Employment levels remained relatively flat for most, but some larger firms added to headcount. Complaints about difficult-to-fill positions persisted, though there was little evidence of contacts aggressively raising pay to attract talent. For some financial institutions, the increased availability of full-time positions in the marketplace has created turnover of part-time staff such as tellers. In addition to the usual difficult-to-fill positions (information technology, accounting, and compliance and risk), we heard stories of challenges filling lower level, low-skill positions in industries such as hospitality. In the Space Coast region, there were reports of overall shortages of workers.

Costs, wages, and prices
Most contacts indicated that nonlabor inputs have increased at about the rate of inflation. However, commodities like resins, plastics, and aluminum are expected to remain fairly flat for the foreseeable future. Construction costs in our area have reportedly stabilized, and fuel prices have lowered considerably. Food costs, particularly proteins, are up compared with last year.

Anecdotes about 2015 health care premiums were mixed, as increases ranged from less than 1 percent to as high as 20 percent. Many companies indicated that they plan to change benefit structures, raise deductibles, alter prescription plans, and eliminate dependent coverage (and so on) in an effort to avoid significantly increasing the proportion that employees pay as a result of worries about talent acquisition and retention. Others are moving ahead with shifting some measure of any increases to employees.

Most contacts reported moderate wage pressures for technically skilled positions. Some reported increased starting salaries for some lower-level jobs such as call center positions, and some are forced to offer more to attract those with internet or digital media skills. Most contacts continued to budget merit increases in the range of 2.5 to 3 percent.

Availability of credit and investment
Access to capital and availability of credit continued to be a nonissue for the majority of our contacts, but some small organizations continued to struggle for funds. Banking contacts reported strong loan demand for purchase mortgages in addition to new construction loans, refinances, home improvement loans, consumer loans, and increases in commercial loans. Reports of capital expenditures including major port expansions, health care facility construction projects, and merger and acquisition activity were widespread across the region.

Business outlook
Some contacts mentioned downside risks to the outlook, including the outcome of today's election, increased government regulations, and—most recently—worries about weakness internationally and the resulting market volatility that crept up in mid-October. Generally, however, contacts reported an expectation for higher growth in the short and medium term.

Tell us: What's your outlook for growth for the rest of 2014 and into the next year?

By Chris Oakley, regional executive, and Sarah Arteaga, REIN director, both at the Atlanta Fed's Jacksonville Branch

November 4, 2014 in Economic conditions, Employment, Labor Markets, Outlook, Prices, Recovery, Southeast | Permalink

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10/30/2014


Regional Housing Sales, Construction Slowing

The Atlanta Fed conducts a monthly poll of regional residential brokers and homebuilders to track emerging trends in housing markets. The latest results, which reflect activity in September 2014, suggest continued slow growth in sales and construction activity.

Many residential brokers and builders indicated that home sales were flat to slightly up from the year-earlier level. The report from brokers and builders on buyer traffic was mixed. Those who indicated a decline in traffic suggested that seasonal factors and a decline in buyer confidence were behind the decline. A growing share of residential brokers and builders reported that home inventory levels had increased slightly from the year-earlier level. Comments suggested that well-priced homes are moving quickly, but that many sellers are pricing their homes fairly optimistically, causing inventory to build until prices are adjusted.

Many builders reported that construction activity had increased from the year-earlier level. The drop depicted in the chart below reflects the fact that a growing share of builders reported construction activity as flat to down slightly.

September 2014 Southeast Construction Activity

Most builders indicated that they continue to experience upward pressure on materials prices. Builders’ reports ranged widely when we asked them to specify the materials experiencing the greatest pricing pressure, and their responses included concrete, drywall/sheetrock, and lumber. These reports are fairly consistent with year-over-year changes in the Engineering News Record’s cost indices: on a year-earlier basis, concrete prices are up 3–4 percent, drywall/sheetrock products are up 10 percent, and lumber products are up 7–9 percent.

Builders also continued to report upward pressure on labor costs and that they are having a tougher time filling positions compared to a year earlier. In addition to asking about builders’ difficulty filling positions, we posed a special question about labor shortages. Two-thirds of builders indicated that they were experiencing a labor shortage. Reports about the trades most affected by these shortages were also fairly wide-ranging, but there seemed to be a fair amount of consensus around the idea that framers, masons, carpenters, and drywall installers were the hardest tradespeople to come by on job sites. These results are fairly consistent with report released by the National Association of Home Builders earlier this year.

To explore these results in more detail, or to view other results that were not discussed in this post, please see our Construction and Real Estate Survey results.

Note: The latest poll results, which reflect activity in September 2014, are based on responses from 40 residential brokers and 25 homebuilders and were collected October 6–15. Please sign up if you would like to participate in this poll.

Photo of Jessica DillBy Jessica Dill, senior economic research analyst in the Atlanta Fed's research department


October 30, 2014 in Construction, Economic conditions, Economic Indicators, Prices, Real Estate, Southeast | Permalink

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08/27/2014


Southeast Housing Update: Exploring the Recent Slowdown

Following several months of somewhat disappointing reports on home sales and housing starts, we decided that it was time to ask the residential brokers and builders who participate in our monthly housing market poll to revisit the factors that may be contributing to slower-than-hoped-for growth.

When housing’s momentum began slowing in mid-2013, many contacts pointed to rising mortgage rates as the reason. Then in early 2014, many attributed the continued sluggishness to inclement weather. Although it seemed that weather did, in fact, play a role, our business contacts reported that less affordable buying conditions (for example, higher rates and prices) and limited inventory were greater culprits.

So what is the reason now? Our latest poll results suggest that contacts continue to believe that less affordable buying conditions and limited inventory—plus tight credit conditions—are the main factors behind the slowing activity (see the table).

Factors Influencing the Slow Growth of the Housing Market

Although the results of this special question help us as we think through what might be contributing to the weak growth, it is important to acknowledge that the incoming data (and upwardly revised data from the past few months) suggest that housing activity might not actually be slowing to the degree we previously thought. And in fact, a quick look at the latest poll results (without considering the special question) might also lead one to conclude that regional housing market conditions remain fairly positive. To explore the latest results in more detail, please view our Construction and Real Estate Survey results.

Note: The latest poll results reflect activity in July 2014 and are based on responses from 44 residential brokers and 16 homebuilders and were collected August 4–13. If you would like to participate in this poll, please consider signing up.

Photo of Jessica DillBy Jessica Dill, senior economic research analyst in the Atlanta Fed's research department


August 27, 2014 in Economic conditions, Housing, Inventories, Prices, Real Estate, Southeast | Permalink

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06/25/2014


The Growing Gulf Coast: Good Signs despite Low Sales

The weather is not the only thing about to heat up along the Gulf Coast. The economy is warming up as well, according to the Regional Economic Information Network’s (REIN) contacts. The REIN team in the Atlanta Fed’s New Orleans Branch reaches out to leaders from large and small businesses from all sectors of the economy and to representatives from community groups along the Gulf Coast in order to gain a representative picture of regional economic conditions, which, by the way, appears to be markedly improving. Since mid-April, we’ve held 15 one-on-one interviews, one roundtable with a mix of business leaders, our branch board meeting, and we also attended several conferences.

According to our contacts, business sentiment has picked up. Most of them were optimistic about near-term (three to six months) and medium-term (two to three years) growth and were more confident in their outlook than in the recent past. Of contacts who indicated they were experiencing second quarter growth, approximately half believed the growth was a rebound from an unusually weak first quarter, with the other half attributing it to a modest increase in economic strength.

Burgeoning capital investment was a consistent recent theme. A lack of “visibility”—or a firm’s ability to confidently predict future business conditions—was not reported as a significant inhibitor of capital investment. Nearly every contact shared information about merger and acquisition (M&A) activity or capital expenditure projects under way or planned for 2014. Most projects involved expansion to meet growing demand, including constructing new facilities and upgrading existing ones, although several projects involved new product offerings. Consistent with the recent trend along the Gulf Coast, much of the increased investment stemmed from the energy sector. However, we noticed investment picked up in other industries, such as in education and medical services.

Business contacts also reported that spending on consulting services for leadership development and organizational culture training increased. The addition of new leaders, M&A activity that resulted in conflicting organizational cultures, and the recession-era deferral of discretionary spending generated a surge in demand for these services.

Residential real estate across the Gulf Coast picked up marginally since mid-April. The median residential home sale was around $200,000, though inventories were low. Homes in coastal Alabama’s high-end market (over $600,000) were slow to move, and a lack of high-end inventory in coastal Mississippi led to increased construction in that market. In past months, we heard reports of an increase in raw land deals along the Florida Panhandle, and similarly, a recent reemergence of raw land deals was reported in coastal Alabama, often 50 percent bank-financed with fully collateralized loans. Commercial construction also resurfaced in parts of the region.

Resting retail
Unfortunately, the general optimism was not shared by all sectors. Regional retail contacts shared dampened expectations for the second quarter. Some admitted to difficulty adjusting to a shopping landscape increasingly dominated by the internet, which forced big-box retail stores to rethink sales strategies and reevaluate store locations and sizes and in some cases led to resurgence in the redevelopment of shopping centers.

Bracing for the boom
The employment picture was heartening, with nearly all of our contacts implementing hiring plans. In fact, a few contacts who took steps to reduce employment to “lean and mean” levels during the recession and early recovery admitted they were not so sure the decision was advantageous, and recently they saw productivity increase significantly once they added workers. However, the continued shortage of skilled labor has many contacts worried that some project start dates may be pushed back as they struggle to find qualified people.

Most contacts continued to report isolated wage pressures for skilled labor, medical services, and professional jobs, though some expressed they are bracing themselves for significant wage pressure in the coming months as the economy picks up.

The chatter about plans to increase prices in recent months materialized into reports of price increases, yet contacts admitted the increases were challenging and required a great deal of negotiating.

Overall, the Gulf Coast economy appears to be rising out of the recessionary fog and shedding the winter frost. The picture across most industries was definitively positive, with reports of large investment projects, hiring plans, and price increases.

By Adrienne Slack, vice president and regional executive; Rebekah Durham, economic policy analysis specialist; and Harrison Grieb, economic intern, Regional Economic Information Network, all in the New Orleans Branch of the Atlanta Fed


June 25, 2014 in Construction, Economic conditions, Economic Indicators, Employment, Gulf Coast, Prices, Real Estate, Retail | Permalink

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05/30/2014


Southeast Housing Update: Sales, Prices, Construction Activity Spring Forward

The Atlanta Fed conducts a monthly poll of Southeast broker and builder business contacts in an effort to detect emerging real estate trends prior to the release of official government and other statistics. According to the April 2014 Southeast Housing Market Poll results:

  • There was a rebound in the number of brokers and builders reporting that home sales had increased from the year-earlier level.
  • More brokers but fewer builders noted that buyer traffic had increased from a year earlier.
  • Most brokers continued to indicate that inventory levels were down from the year-earlier level. The report from builders was split down the middle—half of respondents said that new home inventories increased from the year-earlier level, the other half noted new home inventory levels had fallen.
  • The vast majority of brokers and builders continued to report that home prices increased from a year earlier.
  • There was a rebound in the number of builders reporting that construction activity had increased from the year-earlier level.

To explore the latest poll results in more detail, please visit our Construction and Real Estate Survey results.

Note: April poll results are based on responses from 35 residential brokers and 26 homebuilders and were collected May 5–14, 2014. The housing poll's diffusion indexes are calculated as the percentage of total respondents reporting increases minus the percentage reporting declines. Positive values in the index indicate increased activity; negative values indicate decreased activity.

If you would like to participate in this poll, you may sign up here.

Photo of Jessica DillBy Jessica Dill, senior economic research analyst in the Atlanta Fed's research department


May 30, 2014 in Construction, Housing, Prices, Real Estate, Southeast | Permalink

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04/16/2014


Beige Book: Warming Economy Accompanies Spring’s Thaw

Eight times a year, each of the 12 Reserve Banks gathers anecdotal information on current economic conditions in its district through reports from Bank and branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources. Their findings are reported in the Summary of Economic Conditions, also known as the Beige Book. The report is published on the Federal Reserve Board of Governors' website about two weeks prior to each Federal Open Market Committee meeting.

The first sentences of the national summary and each Bank's report often receive much attention because the lead sentence tends to summarize economic conditions in that region.

Here is a compilation of the first sentence of the national summary and each Reserve Bank’s report:

  • National: Reports from the twelve Federal Reserve Districts suggest economic activity increased in most regions of the country since the previous report. (A previous SouthPoint post also mentioned the weather’s effect on overall economic conditions.)
  • Boston: The First District economy continues to expand moderately, according to business contacts, although growth rates vary across sectors and firms.
  • New York: Economic activity in the Second District rebounded since the last report, as the harsh winter weather abated.
  • Philadelphia: Aggregate business activity in the Third District grew at a moderate pace during this current Beige Book period.
  • Cleveland: On balance, economic activity in the Fourth District declined slightly in the past six weeks.
  • Richmond: The Fifth District economy expanded moderately since our last report.
  • Atlanta: On balance, the Sixth District economy expanded at a modest pace from mid-February through March.
  • Chicago: Growth in economic activity in the Seventh District picked up in March, and contacts generally maintained their optimistic outlook for 2014.
  • St. Louis: Business activity in the Eighth District has declined slightly since our previous report.
  • Minneapolis: The Ninth District economy continued to grow at a moderate pace since the last report.
  • Kansas City: The Tenth District economy grew moderately in March, and most contacts were optimistic about future activity.
  • Dallas: The Eleventh District economy grew at a moderate pace over the last six weeks.
  • San Francisco: Economic activity in the Twelfth District continued to improve moderately during the reporting period of mid-February through early April.

As you can see, almost all districts are experiencing the same level of economic activity.

Here are some notable highlights from the Atlanta Fed's contribution to the Beige Book:

Consumer spending and tourism

  • District merchants reported an uptick in activity from mid-February through March following sluggish sales in January, which were widely attributed to the severe winter weather. Light motor vehicle sales grew modestly during the time period.
  • Hospitality contacts in areas negatively affected by the adverse winter weather saw improvements in activity.

Real estate and construction

  • Brokers reported home sales were mixed. Inventory levels continued to fall on a year-over-year basis, and the majority of contacts reported that home prices remained ahead of the year-earlier level.
  • The majority of builders reported that construction activity and new home sales were ahead of the year-earlier level. The majority of contacts continued to report modest home price appreciation.
  • District brokers noted that demand for commercial real estate continued to improve. Construction activity continued to increase at a modest pace from last year.

Manufacturing

  • Manufacturers reported increased activity across the region from mid-February through March. Significant improvements were cited in production and new orders.

Banking and finance

  • Bankers noted an increase in loan demand.

Employment

  • District payroll growth remained constrained from mid-February through March.

Prices and wages

  • Nonlabor input costs increased very slowly, with a few noted exceptions, including rising costs for developed land, construction materials, and food. Profit margins remained tight across most industries as contacts continued to report very little pricing power.
  • Contacts continued to indicate little wage pressure outside of some high-skilled positions.

The next Beige Book will be published June 4.

Photo of Teri GaffordBy Shalini Patel, an economic policy analysis specialist in the Atlanta Fed's research department


April 16, 2014 in Construction, Economic conditions, Economic Indicators, Employment, Housing, Jobs, Labor Markets, Manufacturing, Prices, Purchasing, Real Estate, Unemployment, Weather | Permalink

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04/14/2014


Our Bread and Butter

It’s spring, which means warming weather, getting out the gardening tools, and convening the semiannual meeting of the Atlanta Fed’s Agriculture Advisory Council, which represents diverse agriculture and agribusiness interests across the Southeast.

Prices are always a topic of conversation at council meetings. This meeting was no exception, and here are some examples of what we heard:

  • Fertilizer prices are up.
  • Feed prices are down from last year’s highs.
  • Fuel costs have been stable over the last year.
  • Equipment and seed costs are up.
  • Beef prices are up, and some producers are considering increasing herd size because of favorable prices and lower feed costs.
  • The value on the very best farmland is holding up, but farmland prices may see some corrections, with the biggest changes expected on marginally productive land.

Citrus greening is reducing the supply of Florida oranges, and growers continue to seek ways to mitigate the effects of the disease. Even though costs for products that help fight the disease are up, growers are saying, “If you think it works, you do it.” Growers hope that new research funding included in the recently approved farm bill will help find a solution, but concern also exists that as production declines, processing infrastructure will be lost, which may make it challenging to expand in the future.

Foreign markets have also affected growers. For example, cotton prices are in flux as a result of China’s pricing policy, while dairy prices are enjoying an uptick because of China’s increased purchases. Poultry producers expect this year to be a good one. The poultry industry is setting export records, and producers are saying exports represent future growth.

Finding labor remains difficult for most producers, and the problem is no longer just finding the numbers they need but increasingly finding those with the necessary technical skills as well. Producers are encouraging local junior colleges to offer technical programs for farm workers: “We need fewer but better-educated laborers,” one source said. There is also a growing need for data-management skills. Many growers will outsource data management/analysis to big companies specializing in that area.

Council members agreed that the outcome of the newly signed farm bill remains uncertain as the details are worked out, but they anticipate large farm producers will have to significantly restructure their businesses.

Another challenge is coming from the consumer side, as buyers require unprecedented amounts of information about health and wellness and sustainability processes from agriculture producers. Advisory council members acknowledge that technology makes it possible to supply this information, but the group recognized the need for agriculture producers to have a seat at the table when discussing new requirements.

As the meeting drew to a close, we went around the table one last time, and these comments are among what we heard:

  • “We will get more efficient.”
  • “There will not be a lot of inflation in agriculture in the next year or two.”
  • “Agriculture will go through another cycle of de-peopling,” but “…as the labor required to produce is decreasing, value and next-step processing is not shrinking.”

As I reflect on all I heard that day, I know technology will continue to play a big role in agriculture production, and its use is expanding every day. I also know from talking with our council members that good old-fashioned tenacity, know-how, and the love of farming shine through. The continued marriage of these disciplines will literally be our bread and butter for years to come.

Photo of Teri GaffordBy Teri Gafford, a Regional Economic Information Network director in the Atlanta Fed’s Birmingham Branch


April 14, 2014 in Agriculture, Commodity Prices, Outlook, Prices, Productivity, Southeast, Technology | Permalink

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02/27/2014


Southeast Housing Update: Modest Improvement Continues

According to the latest results from our Southeast housing market poll, contacts continued to indicate that growth remained positive. More than half of our Southeast builder and broker contacts reported that sales increased modestly on a year-over-year basis (see the chart).

January 2014 Southeast Home Sales vs. a Year Earlier

Many builders indicated that buyer traffic had increased on a year-over year-basis. Reports from brokers were mixed (see the chart).

January 2014 Southeast Buyer Traffic vs. a Year Earlier

The majority of our Southeast builder panel indicated that inventory levels had remained unchanged from year-earlier levels, although most of our Southeast broker panel indicated that inventory levels had fallen from year-earlier levels (see the chart).

January 2014 Southeast Home Inventory vs. a Year Earlier

Most brokers and builders continued to report that home prices had increased slightly in January compared to year-ago levels (see the chart).

January 2014 Home Price vs. a Year-ago

Two-thirds of brokers reported that the amount of available credit either met or exceeded demand (see the chart).

Brokers: How available do you perceive mortgage finance to be in your market?

Similarly, two-thirds of builders indicated that the amount of available credit met or exceeded demand (see the chart).

Builders: How available do you perceive mortgage finance to be in your market?

It’s worth noting that while this picture hasn’t drastically improved over time, it hasn’t deteriorated much either despite the recent implementation of mortgage regulations (for example, thequalified mortgage rule, which went into effect on January 10). We plan to keep a close eye on this question as the year unfolds.

Residential construction update
Our builder contacts indicated that construction activity increased slightly on a year-over-year basis but remained unchanged month over month. Nearly three out of four builders reported that activity was in line with their plan for the period.

You may recall from previous SouthPoint posts that builders have faced challenges securing acquisition and development financing for lot development (here) and that builders identified lot availability as one of the biggest risks to their outlook (here). We posed a special question to our builder panel in an effort to gain more insight into the current lot inventory situation. Here are a few of the main takeaways:

  • Overwhelmingly and regardless of the market, builders reported that finished lots are extremely hard to come by in desirable locations. With few finished lots in the most desirable areas, many builders have moved to B and C locations for vertical construction. (B locations have become the new A locations, and C locations have become the new B locations.)
  • As a result of the increased demand for finished lots in good locations, contacts indicated that lot prices were appreciating rather quickly, and that this rate of price appreciation was problematic because the added cost on the front end does not align with the valuation that can be achieved on the back end.
  • A few builders reported that they were in the process of developing new lots in A locations, but many more contacts noted that it was cost-prohibitive to develop raw land in any location at this time. The latter group reported that private acquisition and development money was available to fill the void that banks have left but noted that it was more expensive and would significantly raise the cost of development to the point where it becomes no longer viable. No one on the builder panel seemed to think that it would be viable to develop raw land in B and C locations at this point.

Outlook on sales and construction activity
Over the next three months, most builders and brokers expect home sales to increase. Although expectations remain fairly positive, contacts were slightly less optimistic about sales growth relative to their year-earlier responses (see the charts).

Southeast Builder Home Sales Expectations Next 3 Months

Southeast Broker Home Sales Expectations Next 3 Months

Nearly two-thirds of builder contacts expect construction activity to increase over the next three months. With that said, builders’ outlooks appear to be slightly less optimistic relative to their year-earlier responses.

Southeast Builder Construction Expectations Next 3 Months

Note: January poll results are based on responses from 42 residential brokers and 23 homebuilders and were collected February 3–12, 2014. The housing poll's diffusion indexes are calculated as the percentage of total respondents reporting increases minus the percentage reporting declines. Positive values in the index indicate increased activity, and negative values indicate decreased activity.

If you are a real estate broker or homebuilder and would like to participate in this poll, please let us know by sending a note to RealEstateCenter@atl.frb.org.

Photo of Jessica DillBy Jessica Dill, senior economic research analyst in the Atlanta Fed's research department


February 27, 2014 in Construction, Economic conditions, Economic Indicators, Housing, Inventories, Prices, Real Estate, Southeast | Permalink

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02/04/2014


Southeast Commercial Construction Update Strikes Upbeat Note

The Atlanta Fed’s fourth quarter 2013 commercial construction poll results were fairly optimistic. The majority of commercial construction contacts indicated that pace of nonresidential construction activity (measured by square feet) and the pace of multifamily construction (measured by number of units) had increased from year-earlier levels (see the charts).

Pace of Nonresidential Construction Activity (sq ft) versus a Year Ago

Pace of Multifamily Construction Activity (# of units) versus a Year Ago

Most contacts reported backlogs greater than year-earlier levels, suggesting a healthy pipeline of construction activity (see the chart).

Backlog versus a Year Ago

More contacts reported upward pressure on labor costs than in previous polls (see the chart). Perhaps not surprisingly, this trend of upward pressure on labor costs for commercial contractors is consistent with our recent reports (here and here, for example) of upward pressure on labor costs for residential builders.

Labor Costs versus a Year Ago

Most contacts also noted upward pressure on material costs and have consistently reported this pressure several quarters in a row (see the chart).

Material Costs versus a Year Ago

Relative to recent polls, the number of respondents reporting that the amount of available credit exceeded demand increased; the number of respondents reporting that the amount of available credit fell short of demand also increased (see the chart). Another way of viewing the results is that more than half of the respondents indicated that amount of available credit met or exceeded demand, which has been the case for three consecutive quarters.

How available do you perceive commercial construction finance to be in your market?

When asked what type of projects will dominate the landscape during 2014, business contacts indicated that they plan construction activity across a wide variety of property types. The property types mentioned include multifamily housing/senior housing, education, office, health care/medical, infrastructure/energy, retail/restaurant, municipal buildings, hotels, and industrial/warehouse.

Note: Fourth quarter 2013 poll results were collected January 6–15, 2014, and are based on responses from 19 business contacts. Participants of this poll included general contractors, subcontractors, lenders, developers, and material fabricators with footprints of varying sizes across the Southeast.

If you are a commercial contractor and would like to participate in this poll, please let us know by sending a note to RealEstateCenter@atl.frb.org.

Photo of Jessica DillBy Jessica Dill, senior economic research analyst in the Atlanta Fed's research department


February 4, 2014 in Construction, Housing, Prices, Real Estate, Southeast | Permalink

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